A modern computer system spans many layers: applications, libraries, operating systems, networks, and hardware devices. Building a good system entails making the right trade-offs (e.g., between performance, durability, and correctness) and understanding emergent behaviors—the difference between great system designers and average ones is that the really good ones make these trade-offs in a principled fashion, not by trial-and-error. In this course, we identify some of the key principles underlying successful systems, and learn how to solve problems in computing using ideas, techniques, and algorithms from operating systems, networks, databases, programming languages, and computer architecture. The basic courses on these topics teach how the elemental parts of modern systems work; POCS picks up where those courses leave off and focuses on how the pieces come together to form useful, efficient systems.

This course is targeted primarily at students who wish to acquire a deep understanding of computer system design or pursue research in systems. It is an intellectually challenging, fast paced course, in which survival requires a solid background in operating systems, databases, networking, programming languages, and computer architecture. Please see the syllabus for more information.